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Crescent Moon

Crescent Moon

RRP: £65.00
Price: £32.5
£32.5 FREE Shipping

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Description

In Crescent Moon, the influence and assault actions are how you gain influence or control of a hex (respectively). Move any number of your units to an adjacent hex that is controlled by another player to perform an assault action, then resolve combat. For the influence action, you can freely place one of your influence tokens in a hex adjacent to where you have presence if no other player has presence and there is no Murshid influence adjacent to the target hex. Otherwise, you place the challenge token and resolve an influence contest, which has some similarities to combat that occurs from the assault action. In another particularly devious detail, the influence-exerting Murshid can use the sway of their influence tokens - which can coexist alongside another player’s military control of a space, signifying the separate rule by iron fist or hearts and minds - to offer support to another player fighting in a nearby region in exchange for a number of victory points. If the warring player wins, the Murshid gains the points - whether or not they did actually throw in with the side, encouraging them to help without guaranteeing that they will follow through on the promise. I am surprised how often relationships turned on a dime in the same round, or even the same action. Importantly, interactions between players are left loose but vital enough to encourage a constant thread of diplomacy even as those same players wrestle over valuable spots on the map, hoping to hold onto them to score points and gain income at the turn of each year. Crescent Moon is an area control game for four or five players. Take on the role of one of five radically asymmetric characters, each with their own objectives to fulfil, unique actions to utilise, and game-changing special powers to employ. Build symbiotic relationships with your allies, undermine your rivals, and choose your friends and enemies wisely in this cut-throat game of power and politics.

When a battle is started, all involved parties secretly select cards from their hand to play, and then simultaneously reveal them. Many cards are reusable once per round, so there is a resource management aspect to these decisions. If combat occurs early in a round, do I play all my cards now, or risk saving some for potential later battles? Of the units cards, there are some that have an OK effect and are useful in most battles and some that have a great effect but are more situational - for example ‘camelry’ is a unit card that performs excellently in desert areas – so again you have to consider carefully when to use them. There are also some unit cards that allow the faction to escape casualties, allowing bluffing about whether a faction is truly committing to win a battle, or perhaps just feinting to cause an opponent to waste resources. So Osprey Games has focussed very much on a positive playing experience and not on the historical accuracy of Crescent Moon. The game intentionally creates gameplay that is removed from what actually went on in the 10th century in the Middle East, especially when it comes to the wars that were fought. After all, combat is reduced to moving wooden tokens and playing cards, then removing tokens from the board, just like many other games. Final Words Crescent Moon hit retail in late May 2022. I received a copy from Osprey in April, and immediately went about playing the game. Power cards are used to gain the upper hand in battles, but sometimes come at the cost of paying your opponents. | Image credit: Osprey Games My oldest daughter played clarinet and I got her a middle grade one so we didn't have to rent it. Of course, just after we got it she quits.

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Pre-pub link is up, and the game is getting great numbers to start. https://www.gmtgames.com/p-1083-wings-for-the-baron-deluxe-gmt-edition.aspx

It’s clear that you’re supposed to play the factions in a certain manner. They need to work together with one another (when the time is right). This is all well and good, but it sometimes feels like the game is too driven in this respect. Scripted, even. In other asymmetrical games, even though my faction had a direction, I still had freedom to play with variation.

You create a map of terrain hexes – 13 hexes for four players: 16 hexes for five. There are five different suggested layouts, recommended for your first few times playing. These set-ups also have a default starting positions on them for the factions. You and your opponents fight over this land, aiming to control areas of it at the end of each ‘year’. I mean it. Even at the start of games, you are going to start working the floor. Buy a card from the Sultan early on. Find a way to massage your relationship with the Murshid, before you really need that faction’s help to win ties. And for the Nomad, it is never too early to start bribing mercenaries if you don’t have your own armies. Crescent Moon has been designed to provide a very high level of interactivity, both on the board and in negotiation, while avoiding being predictable. In area control games it is often advantageous to promise and betray - that comes with the territory (literally). But in Crescent Moon , while it is very hard to win without at least some negotiation, it is not required to always negotiate in bad faith. Because each faction has different ways of scoring points, it is not a zero-sum game. Faction positions can co-exist and overlap on the board. Players can make mutually beneficial agreements that don't inevitably end in betrayal ... Each character is a role, and players should play their roles with relish, but also good humour and grace."

When you buy power cards, if the card is in the near, middle, or far market you pay the required number of coins to the player aligned with the card. However, if you buy a card from one of the main markets aligned with your own character, you instead pay half the price to the bank. Alternatively, when you buy a card from the Sultan’s market, you agree on a price, and then pay the agreed upon amount of coins to the Sultan, regardless of which character is aligned with the card. Crescent Moon is in some ways a demanding game of its players. Negotiation is critical to success and the overall experience. But you can’t really make a rule that says a player MUST negotiate. Well, you can, but that is taking things to the extreme. Crescent Moon is an area control game for four or five players. Take on the role of one of five radically asymmetric characters, each with their own objectives to fulfil, unique actions to utilise, and game-changing special powers to employ. Build symbiotic relationships with your allies, undermine your rivals, and choose your friends and enemies wisely in this cut-throat game of power and politics.

Don’t Pay MSRP, Then Enjoy

As the sun rises over the deserts, rivers, and oases of the Caliphate, a delicate balance has been upset. As one of many rival powers in the region, you now have the opportunity to alter the course of history and seize power for yourself. I wasn’t in the winning position, but because my role was to be ‘the bully’, they treated me like I was. Root‘s victory points are public, which helps avoid this. In Crescent Moon, everything’s kept secret. Is that a good thing?



  • Fruugo ID: 258392218-563234582
  • EAN: 764486781913
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